(WOMENSENEWS)— As Democrats and Republicans hammer out their platforms there’s a question this year more than ever about the planks and the two leading candidates.

In the case of Democrat Hillary Clinton, current conversations center on how delegates she appointed are voting in platform committee meetings.

On the key question of health care, for instance, they voted in June against an amendment on “Medicare For All single-payer health care system to guarantee health care as a right.” They struck it down in favor of building on the Affordable Care Act. Proponents of the amendment, largely appointed by upstart challenger Sen. Bernie Sanders, say the current system still includes many of the downfalls of a for-profit health care system that charges high premiums and involves a two-tier structure that leaves low-income people with an inferior system.

Meanwhile, Republican Donald Trump has run into consistent problems with the Republican Party establishment over a range of issues. Domestically, these issues include a ban on Muslims, tax policy and federal funding for Planned Parenthood.

Although party platforms are not strictly binding, they reflect the direction of party leaders and set the stage for some of the issues that will be duked out on the national stage during the general elections.

Here’s what we’ve found about that and other domestic issues from around the web.

Abortion

Hillary Clinton

    • Supports regulations that would limit “late-pregnancy” abortions, so long as there are exceptions for the mother’s health. Opposes efforts in Congress to pass a federal law banning abortions after 20 weeks with no exceptions. “Under Roe v. Wade, it is appropriate to say in these circumstances” that abortion rights may be restricted, she said, “so long as there’s an exception for the life and health of the mother.”

Donald Trump

    • February 2016: “As far as Planned Parenthood is concerned, I’m pro-life,” Trump asserted on the debate stage at the University of Houston. “I’m totally against abortion, having to do with Planned Parenthood. But millions and millions of women — cervical cancer, breast cancer — are helped by Planned Parenthood.” Trump’s stance on abortion is distinguishable from many earlier Republican candidates because he does not oppose Planned Parenthood outright.

Contraceptive Coverage

Hillary Clinton

Donald Trump

LGBT Equality, HIV/AIDS

Hillary Clinton

      • Supports the fight for full federal equality for LGBTQ+ communities. Aims to support LGBTQ+ youth through efforts to end homelessness and ban conversion therapy on minors. Aims to end discrimination of LGBT people in the military and supports the right of transgender personnel to serve openly.

Donald Trump

        • Believes that states should decide whether transgender people can use restrooms matching their gender identity and opposes same-sex marriage. Initially criticized North Carolina’s recent bill that prohibits transgender people from using the bathroom conforming to their identity. He cited economic repercussions the state faced and that there were so few complaints in the first place.
        • 2013: “I think I’m evolving, and I think I’m a very fair person, but I have been for traditional marriage. I am for traditional marriage, I am for a marriage between a man and a woman.” The New York Times also chronicled his history of donating money to AIDS research and said Trump’s private club in Palm Beach was the first one there to admit openly gay couples.

 Child Care

Hillary Clinton

        • Wants to limit child care costs, saying parents should not have to pay more than 10 percent of their income on child care. Subsidies and tax relief would aid low-income families.
        • Supports investing in early childhood programs and expanding preschool access, often advocating for an every child in every zip code approach.

Donald Trump

        • Backs on-site child care by employers: “It’s not expensive for a company to do it.”

Paid Family, Sick Leave

Hillary Clinton

        • Supports paid family leave and affordable child care; wants to guarantee up to 12 weeks of paid family and medical leave, ensure at least a two-thirds wage replacement rate for workers and pay for paid leave through tax contributions from the wealthiest Americans.

Donald Trump

        • Views are unclear. “Well it’s something that’s being discussed, I think we have to keep our country very competitive, so you have to be careful of it.” Skip to 1:36 in the video for his response.

Health Care

Hillary Clinton

        • Opposes any effort to privatize or weaken Medicare and Social Security. Aims to expand Social Security by asking the wealthiest to contribute more.
        • Supports some health care system reform; advocates for lower prices for prescription drugs for seniors receiving Medicare.
        • Wants to expand Social Security benefits for widows and those who took time out of the paid workforce to care for a child or sick family member.

Donald Trump

        • “I want to get rid of Obamacare and get you something great,” Trump said. “We have some people that won’t be able to live. We have to help people. Don’t we have to help? What are we going to do, let them die in the street?”
        • Advocates for a free market approach. Aims to allow sale of insurance across state lines to increase competition, allow individuals to fully deduct health insurance premiums from tax returns and incorporate tax-free health savings accounts as part of personal estate. Advocates for price transparency to allow easier shopping, the removal of federal regulation around Medicaid and to allow safe drugs from overseas into the market.

Minimum Wage

Hillary Clinton

        • Says a higher minimum wage will help close the gender pay gap and lift women out of poverty; supports state and local efforts to go above the federal floor.

Donald Trump

        • Opposes raising the minimum wage.

Education

Hillary Clinton

        • Advocates for high-quality education for every American child. “We know that when girls have equal access to education in both primary and secondary schools, cycles of poverty are broken, economies grow, glass ceilings crack and potential is unleashed.”
        • At the college level, will push for “an affordable and realistic family contribution” that does not include Pell Grants, which she says should be used for a student’s living expenses. Supports maintaining a work-study program where students work 10 hours a week and allowing graduates to refinance existing loan debt at lower rates.

Donald Trump

        • Objects to common core. “Education through Washington, D.C., I don’t want that,” Trump said. “I want local education, I want the parents and I want all of the teachers, and I want everybody to get together around a school and to make education great.”

Immigration

Hillary Clinton

        • Supports reform. She wants to prioritize keeping families together by closing private immigrant detention centers, promote naturalization to support immigrant integration.

Donald Trump

        • “A nation without borders is not a nation. There must be a wall across the southern border.” He says he will get Mexico to pay for this wall by threatening trade, immigration visas and the ability of current immigrants to wire money home.

        • “A nation without laws is not a nation. Laws passed in accordance with our Constitutional system of government must be enforced.” Trump wants to triple the number of Immigrations and Customs Enforcement officers and implement a national e-verify.
        • “A nation that does not serve its own citizens is not a nation. Any immigration plan must improve jobs, wages and security for all Americans.”

Gun Control

Hillary Clinton

        • Supports expanding background checks to sales that don’t currently require them, repealing the gun industry’s unique immunity from lawsuits and supports reinstating assault weapons ban.

Donald Trump

        • Trump stated tragedies like Orlando and Paris could have been prevented had people with guns been present to defend innocents.
        • Increase prosecution of violent crime and supports the now defunct Project Exile, a Virginia program that mandated a five-year minimum sentence for any crime carried out with a gun.
        • Proponent of fixing the mental health system but has yet to come forth with a plan to do so.
        • Correct the background check system, but not expand it, by filling gaps in the existing record. Opposes bans on assault weapons, supports national right to carry and opposes banning military from carrying firearms on bases.
        • Politifact rated his stance as a full flop:
          • 2000: “I generally oppose gun control,” he wrote then, “but I support the ban on assault weapons and I support a slightly longer waiting period to purchase a gun. With today’s internet technology we should be able to tell within 72 hours if a potential gun owner has a record.”
          • 2015: “Gun and magazine bans are a total failure,” he said. “That’s been proven every time it’s been tried. Opponents of gun rights try to come up with scary sounding phrases like ‘assault weapons’, ‘military-style weapons’ and ‘high capacity magazines’ to confuse people. What they’re really talking about are popular semi-automatic rifles and standard magazines that are owned by tens of millions of Americans.”

Sexual Assault

Hillary Clinton

        • Supports providing comprehensive support to survivors to ensure fair processes in campus disciplinary proceedings and the criminal justice system. There is much debate around what a campus sexual assault bill will look like, but Clinton has so far stayed silent on what version she will support.
        • Advocating for increased sexual violence prevention education programs that cover consent and bystander intervention in colleges and secondary schools.

Donald Trump

        • No official stance found, but has expressed a connection between high numbers of unreported sexual assault and adults living together.