Medicine

TOP STORY

In China, Breast Cancer Treatment Scarce, Outdated

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Premier Li Keqiang promised to implement a scheme for universal coverage for major diseases, including breast cancer. But costs are still expected to be too high for many patients. Awareness is also lagging and doctors and adequate treatments are in short supply.

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